Spike Lavender

Spike Lavender oil (Lavandula spica & latifolia)

You can find Spike Lavender in Mother Gaia’s Sprays and Lotions, just shop online or send us an email here.

According to BodyBliss.com/blog. There are three basic types of Lavender available.

The first is Spike Lavender (Lavandula spicata). This wild character smells a bit like its name would lead you to believe…rough and spiky. It is full of camphoraceous notes and is not likely to soothe or relax you.

The second are the True Lavenders (Lavandula angustifolia or Lavandula officinalis). This type of Lavender can be further divided into what the French call Fine or Population lavenders, and the Clonal Lavenders.

  1. A Clonal Lavender is a True Lavender that has been bred for certain characteristics (most usually a sweet bouquet) and which is propagated by taking cuttings from the parent plant, as opposed to by seed.
  2. The Population Lavenders are the original Lavenders of Provence and because they are grown from seed, each plant will have a unique genetic make up and this can be seen in the variance in the appearance of the plants in the field. This variance also gives the essential oil a rich complex bouquet, and a correspondingly rich therapeutic potential. Population Lavenders require cool air to thrive, so they are only found at high elevations.

The third and final group are the Lavandins. Lavadins are types of Lavender produced by interbreeding the True Lavenders with the Spike Lavenders. There are many different strains of Lavadin, of which Abrialis, Super and Grosso are perhaps the most common. The reason that so much of the ‘lavender’ sold these days comes from strains of Lavandin plants is because these hybrid plants grow vigorously to a large size, they resist disease, and they have large flower spikes that yield a lot of oil – making the essential oil inexpensive.

We are discussing the benefits of spike lavender.

Lavandula spica (spicata)

A beautiful dwarf form of English Lavender. Very Fragrant, intense blue flowers are held on short erect stems during spring summer. The flowers are held above a neat, compact, silver-grey mound of camphor scented foliage just 25cm across. Great cut flowers and dries beautifully.  Lovely small specimen for pots or makes a very tidy border edging plant. Enjoys full sun in well drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil. Tolerates dry periods. Frost hardy once established.

Spike Lavender is differentiated by its minty, herbal scent. This aroma is helpful for supporting the respiratory system as well as local circulation. Spike Lavender is also more stimulating and active on the skin than Lavender Angustifolia.

Spike lavender is wonderfully cooling when hot flashes hit. Not nearly as harsh as peppermint and yet cools the entire system when applied in diluted form onto the skin. Assists in balancing hormones associated with body temperature and regulation.

Blends well with:  Bay Laurel, Black Pepper, Black Spruce, Cedar Atlas, Clove, Eucalyptus Radiata, Eucalyptus Globulus, Balsam Fir, Douglas Fir, Silver Fir, Frankincense, Hyssop Decumbens, Inula, Lavender, Oregano, Palmarosa, Patchouli, Peppermint, Wild Scotch Pine, Rosemary Cineol, Sage, Tea Tree, Thyme, Wintergreen.

Safety Information: Do not apply directly on young children. Do not ingest.

Maximum Adult Dilution: 19%; 114 drops per ounce of carrier

Recommended Dilution: 1-5%; 6 – 30 drops per ounce of carrier

Lavandula latifolia

Known as broadleaved lavender, spike lavender or Portuguese lavender, is a flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae, native to the western Mediterranean region, from central Portugal to northern Italy (Liguria) through Spain and southern France. Hybridization can occur in the wild with English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). The scent of Lavandula latifolia is stronger, with more camphor, and more pungent than Lavandula angustifolia scent. For this reason the two varieties are grown in separate fields.

Aromatically, Spike Lavender Oil tends to blend well with the same families of essential oils that traditional Lavender Oil does including other floral, mint and coniferous oils. Rosemary Essential Oil, depending on the chemotype, also tends to have a large percentage of camphor. If you particularly like the aroma of Rosemary Oil, you should find the aroma of Spike Lavender Essential Oil appealing.

Spike Lavender Essential Oil possesses usage applications similar to that of traditional Lavender Oil. However, it’s greater percentage of the constituent camphor gives it stronger analgesic and expectorant properties. It is a better choice to ease headaches or use as an expectorant in the diffuser. Diluted for topical use, it can be used to help ease aches, pains or the discomfort associated with arthritis. It is also reported to be effective in repelling insects.

Due to its camphor content of up to 25%, Spike Lavender Essential Oil should be used with care. Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young do not specify any contraindications for Spike Lavender Essential Oil, but state that it may be mildly neurotoxic. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 329.]

Properties : Nervous system regulation, calming, sedative, anti-depressive, powerful antispasmodic, muscle relaxer, hypotensive, general and pulmonary antiseptic, heart tonic and tonic, cardiac nerves contrastimulant, skin repair, skin regeneration (external use), anti-inflammatory, analgesic

Indications : Infectious, cicatricial or allergic skin ailments, acne, couperosis, psoriasis, pruritus, eczema, wounds, burns, insect bites, razor burn, eschars, ulcers, stretch marks, insomnias, sleeping disorders, spasms, irritability, anxiety, depressive state, stress, cramps, contractures and muscular spasms, hypertension, palpitation, tachycardia, nervous disorders, asthma, digestive spasms, nausea, migraine, rheumatisms

Energetic and Emotional Effect: Solar plexus action. Lavender calms irritations associated with power confrontations and interpersonal relationships. It also calms anxious people and anger in general.

For congestion: Massage around the ear and lymphatic nodes with a few drops, pure or diluted in vegetable oil.

To calm anxiety and stress episodes: Apply five or six drops on the solar plexus (diaphragm) and massage while breathing slowly and profoundly.

To ease sleep: Mix one drop of essential oil in two table spoons of maple syrup. In your mixer, blend 500ml of plain yogurt

References:

  1. https://www.seedscape.net.au/shop/hardy-perennial/lavandula-spicata-muffets-children/
  2. https://www.essentialoils.gr/en/essential-oil-singles/208-lavender-spike-essential-oil-bio-lavandula-latifolia-cineolifera-florihana.html
  3. https://dengarden.com/gardening/Best-French-English-Lavenders-Lavender-lavendar-grow-in-Zone-5-ontario-flowers-herbs
  4. https://bodybliss.com/blog/a-lesson-in-lavender-june-20th-/
  5. http://veriditasbotanicals.com/products/essential-oils/lavender-spike/
  6. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/spike-lavender-oil.asp
  7. https://everything-lavender.com/spike-lavender.html
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26441063
  9. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1021949814000799
  10. https://www.iso.org/standard/55964.html
  11. http://eol.org/pages/590824/details
  12. https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Lavandula_latifolia
  13. https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/371559-Lavandula-latifolia
  14. https://aliksir.com/en/lavender-spike-lavandula-latifolia-essential-oil.html

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