Mother Gaia’s Allergy Relief Tea

With February coming to a close we are all starting to think about Spring. Allergy season is just around the corner and we’re all dreading it. So, what’s your plan this year? Suffer with antihistamine side effects or try something different?

Mother Gaia’s has the simple answer with her Organic Allergy Relief Tea!

This simple combination of Stinging Nettles Leaf and Red Clover Flowers and Herb has strong antihistamine (anti-allergy) and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce sinus pressure and stop histamine reactions. All of this without any side effects! No drowsiness! No foggy brain! No painful over-drying of sinuses!

Why Does It Work?

This proprietary blend of Stinging Nettles, Red Clover Flowers, and Red Clover Leaf provides a wide variety of nutrients essential for health. The specific combination of nutrients found in these herbs are known to reduce allergy symptoms with the first dose and to continue reducing allergic reactions and their symptoms with continued use.

The great thing about these herbs is that they are simply nutrient dense vegetables that you would have extreme difficulty overdosing or getting ill from consuming them in tea multiple times daily. They provide support without side effects for the entire season and on if you also struggle with inside allergens.

Consuming this tea on a daily basis has been known to reduce or eliminate indoor and pet allergies as well, with continued use and depending on the severity of your allergies. You can get relief without feeling drunk and dumb, that’s how drugs like Sudafed always made me feel anyway.

Either way your eliminating the horrible side effects of antihistamines and reducing the chemicals in your body while also getting more water and nutrients. Four very important, and yet so simple, ways to improve your overall health and wellness.

by Uwe H. Friese, Bremerhaven 2003

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica): an herbaceous perennial flowering plant originally from Europe, Africa, and Asia. It is cultivated for food, textiles, medicines, and teas worldwide now.

Cooked Nettles taste similar to spinach and is rich in vitamins A and C, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. Fresh leaves contain approximately 82.4% water, 17.6% dry matter, 5.5% protein, 0.7 to 3.3% fat, and 7.1% carbohydrates. They must be cooked or dried to be safely handled or eaten.

  • Nettle has agglutinin, acetophenone, alkaloids, acetylcholine, chlorogenic acid, butyric acid, chlorophyll, caffeic acid, carbonic acid, choline, histamine, coumaric acid, formic acid, pantothenic acid, kaempferol, coproporphyrin, lectin, lecithin, lignan, linoleic and linolenic acids, palmitic acid, xanthophyll, quercetin, quinic acid, serotonin, stigmasterol, terpenes, violaxanthin, and succinic acid in its chemical content.
  • Nettle also contains 2,5% fatty substance, 14–17% albumins, and 18% protein in dry matter. Seeds of nettle contain 8–10% fixed oil. 1 kg fresh plant contains 130 mg vitamin C, 730 mg carotene, and oxalate.
  • Stinging hair of nettle contains formic acid, histamine, and acetylcholine.
  • Leaves of nettle contain provitamin A, vitamin B1, K, xanthophylls, and sistosterin
  • Ashes of nettle contain 6,3% ferric oxide, potassium, calcium, and silicium.

Dried Nettles herb has been used in the traditional Austrian medicine internally (as tea or fresh leaves) to treat disorders of the kidneys and urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, locomotor system, skin, cardiovascular system, hemorrhage, influenza, rheumatism, and gout.

Nettle stems contain a bast fiber that has been traditionally used for the same purposes as linen and is produced by a similar retting process. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. The fibers are coarser, however.

Historically, nettles have been used to make clothing for 2,000 years, and German Army uniforms were almost all made from nettle during World War I due to a potential shortage of cotton. More recently, companies in Austria, Germany, and Italy have started to produce commercial nettle textiles.

Red Clover (Trifolium pretense): a short-lived herbaceous perennial flowering plant in the bean family, native to Europe, Western Asia, and Africa. Is now naturalized in many other regions.

Red clover’s flowers and leaves are edible and can be added as garnishes to any dish. The flowers often are used to make jelly and tisanes and are used in essiac recipes. Their essential oil may be extracted, and its unique scent used in aromatherapy.

Red Clover is used in traditional medicine of India as deobstruent, antispasmodic, expectorant, sedative, anti-inflammatory and antidermatosis agent. In alternative medicine, red clover is promoted as a treatment for a variety of human maladies, including symptoms of menopause, coughs, disorders of the lymphatic system and a variety of cancers.

Dietary amounts of red clover are safe, but dietary supplement extracts may cause rash-like reactions, muscle ache, headache, nausea, vaginal bleeding in women, and slow blood clotting. Due to its coumarin derivatives, T. pratense should be used with caution in individuals with coagulation disorders or currently undergoing anticoagulation therapy.

https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/red-clover-blossoms/profile

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_dioica
  2. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/nettle-leaf/profile
  3. https://i2.wp.com/www.compoundchem.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/The-Chemistry-of-Stinging-Nettles-2016.png
  4. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-664/stinging-nettle
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349212/
  6. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1756464617300944
  7. https://www.compoundchem.com/2015/06/04/nettles/
  8. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313846106_Chemical_composition_of_stinging_nettle_leaves_obtained_by_different_analytical_approaches
  9. https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/catalog/5640710
  10. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/564367/citations/
  11. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/stinging-nettle
  12. https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-nettle-89576
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_pratense
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16566672
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1780253/
  16. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7211943_The_Chemical_and_Biologic_Profile_of_a_Red_Clover_Trifolium_pratense_L_Phase_II_Clinical_Extract
  17. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/aj/abstracts/46/9/AJ0460090397?access=0&view=pdf
  18. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/trifolium-pratense
  19. http://powo.science.kew.org/taxon/urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:523575-1
  20. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/red-clover-herb/profile