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Thank you for your support!

Have a wonderful day!

Jennifer Lawson, aka Mother Gaia

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Cinnamon Leaf Oil

(Cinnamomum verum)

You will find it in Mother Gaia’s lotions, sprays, candles, and oils.

Cinnamon leaf oil comes from Cinnamonum verum (also called Laurus cinnamomum) from the Laurel (Lauraceae) plant family. This small and bushy evergreen tree is native to Sri Lanka, but now grows in many countries such as India, China, Bangladesh, Myanmar, and Indonesia. There are actually over 100 varieties of C. verum, with Cinnamonum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) and Cinnamomun aromaticum (Chinese cinnamon) as the most consumed.

Cinnamon bark oil is extracted from the outer bark of the tree, resulting in a potent, perfume-quality essential oil. Cinnamon bark oil is extremely refined and therefore very expensive for everyday use, which is why many people settle for cinnamon leaf oil, as it’s lighter, cheaper, and ideal for regular use. Cinnamon leaf oil has a musky and spicy scent, and a light yellow tinge that distinguishes it from the red-brown color of cinnamon bark oil.

Composition of Cinnamon Leaf Oil
The oil extracted from cinnamon leaves contain phenols and beneficial components like eugenol, eugenol acetate, cinnamic aldehyde, linalool, and benzyl benzoate. It also has low levels of cinnamaldehyde, an excellent flavoring agent and the active component that helps repel mosquitoes and other insects. The leaf oil has a higher eugenol content then the bark oil, which increases its analgesic properties.

Blends Well With
Benzoin, bergamot, cardamom, clove, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, vanilla, ylang ylang

Blending: This oil blends well with various essential oils, so it is added to many aromatherapy preparations. It enhances the effectiveness of other herbs and essential oils, thus speeding up the treatment of various herbal remedies. Furthermore, many herbs can have an unpleasant taste. Cinnamon or cinnamon oil is often added to herbal preparations to make them taste better.

Benefits of Cinnamon Leaf Oil
The health benefits of cinnamon can be attributed to its antibacterial, antifungal, antimicrobial, astringent and anticlotting properties. The spice is rich in essential minerals such as manganese, iron, and calcium, while also having a high content of fiber.

Cinnamon boosts the activity of the brain and makes it a great tonic. It helps to remove nervous tension and memory loss. Research at the Wheeling Jesuit University in the United States has proved that the scent of the spice has the ability to boost brain activity. The team of researchers, led by Dr. P. Zoladz, found that people who were given cinnamon improved their scores on cognitive activities such as attention span, virtual recognition memory, working memory, and visual-motor response speed.

Cinnamon leaf oil can work wonders as a quick pick-me-up or stress buster after a long and tiring day, or if you want to soothe your aching muscles and joints. This oil has a warm and antispasmodic effect on your body that helps ease muscular aches, sprains, rheumatism, and arthritis. It’s also a tonic that assists in reducing drowsiness and gives you an energy boost if you’re physically and mentally exhausted.

Due to its antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, and antiseptic properties, it is effective for treating external as well as internal infections. Cinnamon leaf oil offers benefits against viral infections, such as coughs and colds, and helps prevent them from spreading. It even aids in destroying germs in your gallbladder and bacteria that cause staph infections. When diffused using a vaporizer or burner, cinnamon leaf oil can help ease chest congestion and bronchitis.

Cinnamon can also help remove blood impurities and even aid in improving blood circulation. This helps ensure that your body’s cells receive adequate oxygen supply, which not only assists in promoting metabolic activity but also helps reduce your risk of suffering from a heart attack.

Cinnamon helps to improve the circulation of blood due to the presence of a blood thinning compound in it. This blood circulation helps to significantly reduce pain. Good blood circulation ensures oxygen supply to the body’s cells, which leads to higher metabolic activity. You can significantly reduce the chance of suffering from a heart attack by regularly consuming it.

Cinnamon leaf oil has gastric benefits as well, mainly because of its eugenol content. It works well for helping alleviate nausea, upset stomach, and diarrhea. It also works as an antibacterial agent that can promote good digestion. Research suggests that cinnamon may help to reduce effects of a high-fat diet. It is very effective against indigestion, nausea, vomiting, upset stomach, diarrhea, and flatulence. Due to its carminative properties, it is very helpful in eliminating excess gas from the stomach and intestines. It also removes acidity and reduces the effects of morning sickness. It is, therefore, often referred to as a digestive tonic.

Cinnamon has the ability to control blood sugar, so diabetics find it very useful because it aids them in using less insulin. Research has shown that it is particularly helpful for patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes patients are not able to regulate their insulin levels properly. Researchers at the US Department of Agriculture’s Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland studied the effect of various food substances that include cinnamon on blood sugar levels. They found that a water-soluble polyphenol compound called MHCP, which is abundant in cinnamon, synergistically acted with insulin and helped in the better utilization of this vital component of human health.

Cinnamon is also an anti-inflammatory substance, so it helps in removing stiffness of the muscles and joints. It is also recommended for arthritis and is known to help in removing headaches caused by cold.
It is believed that the calcium and fiber present in cinnamon provide protection against heart diseases. By including a little of this spice in your food, you can help prevent coronary artery disease and high blood pressure.

Cinnamon is diuretic in nature and helps in the secretion and discharge of urine. It is commonly used as an aphrodisiac and is believed to arouse sexual desire in men and women.

Cinnamon oil is a great mosquito repellent. Research has now proved that it is very effective in killing mosquito larvae. The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (a renowned scientific journal) has reported on a research conducted at the National Taiwan University. Apart from the leaves of cinnamon, its bark is also a good source of cinnamaldehyde, which is an active mosquito-killing agent. This research has paved the way for finding an environmentally safe solution for solving the global menace and disease-spreading capacity of mosquitoes.

Read more...

Tip of the Week

Need more or better sleep? Continued...

So you've cut out some or all caffeine, turned the phone or TV off early, have tried stretching or yoga, are practicing deep breathing, tried calming teas and essential oils, and you're still having trouble sleeping.

Some thoughts -

Have you tried meditation?

Taking even a few minutes per day to meditate can greatly improve relaxation, mental function, and sleep habits.

3 Basic Types of Meditation

Mantras - chanting or humming a sound or word that is appealing to you. Aum or Om are the most common sounds used. It is considered the sound of the universe.

Mandalas - staring at a fully colored mandala and focusing on the flow and shapes is a wonderful way to take your mind away from 'reality' for a time. Coloring mandalas is another great meditation, but is not typically conducive to sleep.

Transcendental - using sounds and/or spinning or moving colors to attain the meditative state. Very effective for those with little ability or training.

What you're trying to do is take your mind away from the constant flow of thoughts, feelings, impressions, and judgements and bring focus on to one single thing. The more you can focus on one thing the more you can align with peace and calm. The more peace and calm you feel the better you sleep, think, and heal.

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Recipe of the Week

Stuffed Apples

A delicious wheat free and low sugar treat.

Ingredients: 

•  2 Granny Smith or Gala apples

•  1 tablespoon unsalted butter

•  1 cup fresh or frozen and thawed cranberries

•  2 tablespoons honey

•  1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom 

•  Zest and juice of 1 orange

•  2 tablespoons chopped roasted almonds 

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Cut 1/2 inch off the top of each apple and reserve tops.

Use a paring knife or spoon to hollow out apples, leaving about a 1/2-inch-thick wall and base. Set aside.

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add cranberries, honey, cardamom, dates and orange juice and zest and cook until cranberries begin to burst and liquid thickens, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in almonds.

Spoon cranberry mixture into apples then replace the apple tops.

Put into a small baking dish filled with 1/4 inch water, cover with foil and bake until tender, 15 to 30 minutes (depending on apples).

Uncover, carefully pour off the water and continue baking until very tender and golden, 10 to 15 minutes more.

Nutritional Info: Per Serving: 320 calories (80 from fat), 9g total fat, 4g saturated fat, 15mg cholesterol, 64g carbohydrates, (9 g dietary fiber, 50g sugar), 3g protein.

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Why We ‘Need’ to Smell Good

Although the human sense of smell is feeble compared to that of many animals, it is still very acute. We can recognize thousands of different smells, and we are able to detect odors even in infinitesimal quantities. The human nose is in fact the main organ of taste as well as smell. The so-called taste-buds on our tongues can only distinguish four qualities – sweet, sour, bitter and salt -all other ‘tastes’ are detected by the olfactory receptors high up in our nasal passages.

The Power of Perception (Angela Melero Dec 12, 2014)
The reason we all feel it’s important to smell good is because it is. “As humans, we believe you are what you smell like,” says Dr. Hirsch. “If you smell good, it’s a reflection of your inner soul and overall self. If you smell bad or unpleasant, it sheds a negative light on you as a person.”
Understanding how the sense of smell works has been heavily studied in recent years. Smell is an important sense as it can alert us to danger like gas leak, fire or rotten food but also is closely linked to parts of the brain that process emotion and memory. Unpleasant and bad smells actually send pain signals to the brain to warn us of possible danger.

Certain scents can change the perception of your physical image, too! Want to shave a couple pounds off in minutes? “Studies have shown that women who smell of floral and/or spicy scents are perceived to be 12 pounds lighter,” explains Dr. Hirsch. It comes as no surprise that fragrance can be also be a vital tool in attracting the opposite sex. Dr. Hirsch says scents like lavender and licorice have been proven to be especially alluring to men.
Research has determined that human attraction is a result of chemical messengers called pheromones. These chemicals trigger everything from physical and sexual attraction to deep emotions of love and empathy and can be detected subconsciously through a variety of avenues including, that’s right, the nose!

How Does the Sense of Smell Work?
The sense of smell, called olfaction—like the sense of taste—is part of the chemosensory system, or the chemical senses. The ability to smell comes from specialized sensory cells, called olfactory sensory neurons, which are found in a small patch of tissue high inside the nose. These cells connect directly to the brain. Each olfactory neuron has one odor receptor. Microscopic molecules released by substances around us—whether it’s coffee brewing or pine trees in a forest—stimulate these receptors. Once the neurons detect the molecules, they send messages to your brain, which identifies the smell. There are more smells in the environment than there are receptors, and any given molecule may stimulate a combination of receptors, creating a unique representation in the brain. These representations are registered by the brain as a particular smell.

Smells reach the olfactory sensory neurons through two pathways. The first pathway is through the nostrils. The second pathway is through a channel that connects the roof of the throat to the nose. Chewing food releases aromas that access the olfactory sensory neurons through the second channel. If the channel is blocked, such as when the nose is stuffed up by a cold or flu, odors can’t reach the sensory cells that are stimulated by smells. As a result, loss of much of the ability to enjoy a food’s flavor. In this way, the senses of smell and taste work closely together.

Without the olfactory sensory neurons, familiar flavors such as chocolate or oranges would be hard to distinguish. Without smell, foods tend to taste bland and have little or no flavor. Some people who go to the doctor because they think they’ve lost their sense of taste are surprised to learn that they’ve lost their sense of smell instead.

The sense of smell is also influenced by something called the common chemical sense. This sense involves thousands of nerve endings, especially on the moist surfaces of the eyes, nose, mouth, and throat. These nerve endings help to sense irritating substances—such as the tear-inducing power of an onion—or the refreshing coolness of menthol.

Variations in Smelling Ability
Our smelling ability increases to reach a plateau at about the age of eight, and declines in old age. Some researchers claim that our smell-sensitivity begins to deteriorate long before old age, perhaps even from the early 20s. One experiment claims to indicate a decline in sensitivity to specific odors from the age of 15! But other scientists report that smelling ability depends on the person’s state of mental and physical health, with some very healthy 80-year-olds having the same olfactory prowess as young adults. Women consistently out-perform men on all tests of smelling ability. Although smoking does not always affect scores on smell-tests, it is widely believed to reduce sensitivity.

Schizophrenics, depressives, migraine sufferers and very-low-weight anorexics often experience olfactory deficits or dysfunctions. One group of researchers claims that certain psychiatric disorders are so closely linked to specific olfactory deficits that smell-tests should be part of diagnostic procedures. Zinc supplements have been shown to be successful in treating some smell and taste disorders.

Read more...

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Product of the Month

Mother Gaia's Hand Sanitizer

Beeswax, Coconut Oil, Sunflower Oil, ZERO Water, & Honey with Lavender, Tea Tree, Sweet Orange, and Red Thyme essential oils.

Prevent the flu without alcohol or petroleum. Moisturizing and naturally antibacterial. Boosting immunity and killing bacteria.

Find yours here.

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Subscriber Promotions

Offers only for subscribers of Mother Gaia's Newsletter

November: BUY ONE GET ONE - Thanksgiving Feast Spray. The wonderful aromas of turkey, falling leaves, and stuffing. 

Find it here.

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Upcoming Events & Classes

 

Dancing Gaia: Nature of Movement & Meditation

Every Saturday @ 8am, Aspen Lodge in Anthem Ranch

We’ll begin class with deep breathing, energy building, and gentle stretching warm-ups. Class continues with a unique blend of Tai Chi, Yoga, Qigong, and Tae Kwon Do style movements. Then we finish each class with a cool down and seated hand posture practice. These classes are for residents only. 

Want Dancing Gaia in your community? Send Mother Gaia an email here.

Wellness Education

Classes held at the Eaton Senior Community, Saturdays @ 1:30pm

323 S Eaton St in Lakewood, CO 80226 (open to the public)

What do you get to learn about?

• Nine dimensions health and wellness

• Physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellness 

• Understanding your body.

• Alternative Medicine — other than surgery and medications

• Ways to improve your health without spending money.

• Cheap and easy remedies to use at home.

• Simple, gentle exercise to improve function.

• Free gifts, snacks, and handouts for attending.

 

Group Classes Mother Gaia Brings to You

How about an unusual birthday party for that open minded teen, loved one, or friend that has everything? Or just a fun way to learn and experience the benefits of natural healing with friends and/or family? Mother Gaia brings all the supplies and information needed for a great educational experience.

Combine classes for a more complete experience and save $10 per person. Host a class and get your first complete set for free! Send Mother Gaia an email and we can schedule it on your time in your space. Mother Gaia is fully insured for your protection, references can be provided upon request.

Aromacraft  

Learn about and experience essential oils and all of their wonderful benefits, create up to seven (7) of your own products to take home including a ZERO water based spray, moisturizing lotion, aroma body/bath oil, natural skin toner, deeply cleansing mudd mask, strengthening tooth powder, and nourishing mineral milk bath. 

Herbalcraft 

Learn about and experience herbal remedies, their amazing benefits and simple uses, and blend up to six (6) products including an herbal tea, naturally scented herbal sachet, moisturizing herbal infused mineral milk bath, infused body/bath oil, cleansing mudd mask, and strengthening and antibacterial tooth powder.

 ***Every participant receives a handout booklet packed full of useful information.***

 

 Looking to try out a class? Mother Gaia offers many great classes here.

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