Marjoram

Marjoram (Origanum majorana)

Find it in Mother Gaia’s Cold & Flu Tea here.

Marjoram (Origanum majorana) is a somewhat cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. In some Middle Eastern countries, marjoram is synonymous with oregano, and there the names sweet marjoram and knotted marjoram are used to distinguish it from other plants of the genus Origanum. It is also called pot marjoram, although this name is also used for other cultivated species of Origanum.

OTHER NAME(S): Essence de Marjolaine, Garden Marjoram, Gartenmajoran, Huile de Marjolaine, Knotted Marjoram, Maggiorana, Majoran, Majorana Aetheroleum Oil, Majorana Herb, Majorana hortensis, Majorana majorana, Marjolaine, Marjolaine des Jardins, Marjolaine Ordinaire, Marjolein, Marjoram Essential Oil, Marjoram Oil, Marubaka, Marwa, Mejorana, Mejram, Origan des Jardins, Origan Marjolaine, Origanum majorana, Sweet Marjoram.

Don’t confuse marjoram with winter marjoram or oregano (Origanum vulgare), which is also referred to as wild marjoram.

BENEFITS OF MARJORAM

Asthma. Early research shows that taking 2 drops of marjoram oil daily along with asthma medication for 3 months might improve lung function in people with asthma better than taking asthma medication alone.

Anti-Inflammatory Effects: When added to your food, marjoram can help reduce your risk of developing inflammatory reactions. It can help with conditions such as asthma, fever, muscle aches, sinus headaches and migraines.

Improved Digestive Function: When used to make tea, marjoram can help improve your digestion by improving your appetite and increasing the production of digestive enzymes that help break down food. In addition, marjoram tea can help alleviate common digestive disorders such as flatulence, constipation, diarrhea and stomach cramps.

Improved Heart Health: Marjoram can help improve your overall cardiovascular health by maintaining normal blood pressure levels, which lowers your risk of hypertension. It’s also known for helping reduce the buildup of cholesterol in your arteries, which can prevent heart disease.

Painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Early research suggests that massaging a cream containing lavender, clary sage, and marjoram essential oils to the abdomen may reduce pain in some women with painful menstrual cramps. The effect of marjoram essential oil alone on menstrual cramps is unclear.

A condition of the ovaries known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Early research suggests that drinking marjoram leaf tea might improve some chemical markers of PCOS, but overall it does not seem to improve body weight, blood sugar, or levels of certain hormones in women with PCOS.

Protection Against Common Illnesses: Marjoram contains various compounds that have effective antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal properties. As such, it can help reduce your risk of diseases such as the common cold, measles, mumps, influenza, food poisoning and various staph infections.

Therapeutic Benefits: Marjoram, in its essential oil form, can help uplift your mood and improve your psychological well-being. It can be used to help relieve insomnia and reduce stress and anxiety.

BENEFITS OF MARJORAM ESSENTIAL OIL

Collected by steam distillation of the fresh flowering tops. Marjoram oil happens to be popular among aromatherapy enthusiasts, and is known for providing a warm, spicy, woody and camphoraceous scent that can provide a vast array of benefits, such as:

Analgesic: Helps alleviate pain related to colds, fevers, inflammation and headache.

Antiseptic: Applying marjoram essential oil on wounds can help prevent them from becoming infected and developing tetanus.

Antibacterial: Helps kill bacteria that may cause various skin and digestive infections.

Carminative: Can help solve digestive problems such as flatulence by relaxing the muscles in the abdominal region.

Diuretic: Can help increase your frequency and quantity of urination, thereby helping improve your ability to eject excess water and harmful toxins from your body.

USES FOR MARJORAM LEAF

Marinades: Upgrade the taste of your marinated meat and fish dishes by adding marjoram to the marinade.

Roasted meats: Marjoram can add an herbal aroma to roasted meats, such as chicken.

Sautéed vegetables: Side dishes such as sautéed vegetables become more flavorful with a dash of marjoram.

Soups: It gives vegetable soups more flavor.

Teas: in medicinal amounts for SHORT periods of time (3 to 5 days at 2 cups a day) to alleviate symptoms of cold and flu, digestive upset, flatulence, and water retention or edema.

DOSAGE

The typical oral dose of marjoram is one to two cups of the tea daily. Prepare the tea by steeping one to two teaspoons of the flower or leaf in one cup of boiling water for five minutes, and then strain. Marjoram can also be used as a poultice or mouthwash; consult with your physician for appropriate concentrations.

Child Dosage: Children should avoid marjoram in amounts larger than those typically used in culinary applications.

SIDE EFFECTS & SAFETY

Marjoram is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for short periods of time.

Marjoram is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used long-term. There is some concern that marjoram could harm the liver and kidneys or cause cancer if used long-term.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use marjoram in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. It might start your period, and that could threaten the pregnancy.

Not enough is known about the safety of using marjoram in medicinal amounts if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Do not give marjoram to children in medicinal amounts. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for them.

Bleeding disorders: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might slow clotting and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Allergy to basil, hyssop, lavender, mint, oregano, and sage: Marjoram can cause allergic reactions in people allergic to these plants and other members of the Lamiaceae family of plants.

Surgery: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using marjoram medicinally at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Lithium interacts with MARJORAM: Marjoram might have an effect like a water pill or “diuretic.” Taking marjoram might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

RECIPES

Spicy Roast Chicken With Tomatoes and Marjoram

Ingredients:

24 ounces of cherry tomatoes (about 4 cups), stemmed

1/4 cup of coconut oil

5 garlic cloves, pressed

1 1/4 teaspoons of dried crushed red pepper

2 Tbsp. of chopped fresh marjoram

4 pasture-raised chicken breast halves with ribs

Himalayan salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Procedure:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.

Toss the tomatoes, coconut oil, garlic, crushed red pepper and 1 tablespoon of marjoram in a large bowl.

Place the chicken slices on a rimmed baking sheet.

Pour the mixture over the chickens, while arranging the tomatoes in a single layer on a sheet around the chickens.

Sprinkle the chicken slices generously with salt and pepper.

Roast until the chicken slices are cooked through and the tomatoes are blistered, for about 35 minutes.

Transfer the chickens to plates.

Spoon the tomatoes and juices over.

Sprinkle the plates with the remaining 1 tablespoon of marjoram and serve.

 

REFERENCES

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjoram
  2. https://www.planttherapy.com/marjoram-sweet-essential-oil?v=256
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-563/marjoram
  4. https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/721189/ORIGANUM_MAJORANA_%28SWEET_MARJORAM%29_LEAF_OIL/
  5. https://www.britannica.com/plant/marjoram
  6. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/marjoram
  7. http://www.ejpmr.com/admin/assets/article_issue/1454479607.pdf
  8. https://articles.mercola.com/herbs-spices/marjoram.aspx
  9. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292161091_Origanum_majorana_L_-Phyto-pharmacological_review
  10. https://plantvillage.psu.edu/topics/marjoram/infos
  11. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/CropOp/en/herbs/culinary/orega.html
  12. https://www.oils4life.co.uk/5ml-Marjoram-ORGANICessential-oil-Sweet-Origanum-Majorana-Leaf-Oil
  13. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/marjoram-oil.asp
  14. https://www.drweil.com/vitamins-supplements-herbs/herbs/marjoram/
  15. http://www.lindbergnutrition.com/ns/DisplayMonograph.asp?StoreID=1c7a08050b8f4419bffba945004ca5d1&DocID=bottomline-marjoram
  16. https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/origanum/majorana/
  17. http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=d828
  18. https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Marjoram+leaf+(Origanum+majorana)&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30217790
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30210537
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30205180
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30138756
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29747749

Mother Gaia’s Cold & Flu Tea

Mother Gaia’s Cold & Flu Tea

This time of year, and especially into January, here in Colorado, everyone gets sick, even the healthiest of people. This is due to the wild swings in outdoor temperatures that happen in a cold desert. If we are not prepared and we get caught in a cold wind or a fast snowstorm and we get chilled, our defenses are lowered, and invaders creep in. Viruses and bacteria love the cold, that’s why we make a fever when infected.

Mother Gaia’s biggest concern is the ingredients found in over-the-counter cold and flu medicines. Most of these chemical concoctions should not be consumed by a human and yet we willingly take them to feel better. This is not because we are stupid but because we are not taught any differently.

Mother Gaia’s blog provides tons of information on alternatives to over-the-counter products (OTCs) and commercialized extracts (herbal supplements). Both to help protect you and your family’s healthy future and to help educate everyone on effective natural alternatives. Nature has always had the best remedies.

Therefore, Mother Gaia has created various all-natural blends for use instead of OTCs.

Learn about Mother Gaia’s other all-natural products here.

COLD & FLU TEA

Peppermint: relieves headache and pain, strengthens immune system, fights sinus problems, thins mucus, soothes upset stomach, reduces stress and anxiety, stimulates alertness, and freshens breath.

Eucalyptus: decongestant, thins mucus, soothes mucous membranes, opens airways, relieves pain, boosts immunity, and is anti-inflammatory.

Marjoram: tonic (nutrient dense), helps fight infection, removes free radicals, tastes great, and soothing to mucous membranes (prevents over-drying of sinuses that happens with decongestants).

Sage: cough suppressant, antispasmodic, improves immune function, enhances mental clarity and improves concentration, soothes sore throat and upset stomach.

Catnip: calms coughs and anxiety, reduces fevers, affects viruses, and is anti-inflammatory. Can cause drowsiness in large amounts, that’s why Mother Gaia uses a small amount in this blend so that the peppermint can prevent that effect.

This tea is a MEDICINE and must be treated as such. It is not healthy to consume it every day, only during times of illness is this blend most beneficial.

Licorice Root

Licorice
By Pharaoh han – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30860013

Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) found in Mother Gaia’s Heartburn Relief Tea, order yours here.

Common Names:  licorice root, licorice, liquorice, sweet root, gan cao, gan-zao, Chinese licorice

Latin Name: Glycyrrhiza glabra, Glycyrrhiza uralensis

Liquorice (British English) or licorice (American English) is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra from which a sweet flavor can be extracted. The liquorice plant is an herbaceous perennial legume native to southern Europe and parts of Asia, such as India. It is not botanically related to anise, star anise, or fennel, which are sources of similar flavoring compounds. Liquorice flavors are used as candies or sweeteners, particularly in some European and Middle Eastern countries.

History of Licorice

The word “liquorice” is derived (via the Old French licoresse) from the Greek γλυκύρριζα (glukurrhiza), meaning “sweet root”, from γλυκύς (glukus), “sweet” and ῥίζα (rhiza), “root”, the name provided by Dioscorides. It is usually spelled “liquorice” in Commonwealth usage, but “licorice” in the United States.

Licorice root is one of the most widely used herbs worldwide and is the single most used herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine today. It was used by the Egyptians as a flavoring for a drink called Mai-sus, and large quantities were found in the tomb of King Tut for his trip into the afterlife. Pliny the Elder recommended it to clear the voice and alleviate thirst and hunger.

Dioscides, when traveling with Alexander the Great, recommended that his troops carry and use licorice to help with stamina for long marches, as well as for thirst in areas of drought. In the Middle Ages it was taken to alleviate the negative effects of highly spicy or overcooked food.

It was also used for flavoring tobacco, and as a foaming agent in fire extinguishers and beer. In a recent survey of Western medical herbalists, licorice ranked as the 10th most important herb used in clinical practice.

An astonishing number of Chinese herbal formulas (over 5,000) use licorice to sweeten teas and to “harmonize” contrasting herbs. Its first documented use dates back to the time of the great Chinese herbal master Zhang Zhong Zhing, about 190 AD, but it was certainly used for many centuries prior to this.

In 1914 the Chicago Licorice Company began to sell Black Vines, the first in a very long line of licorice based modern candies.

Chemical Composition

The scent of liquorice root comes from a complex and variable combination of compounds, of which anethole is up to 3% of total volatiles. Much of the sweetness in liquorice comes from glycyrrhizin, which has a sweet taste, 30–50 times the sweetness of sugar. The sweetness is very different from sugar, being less instant, tart, and lasting longer. The isoflavene glabrene and the isoflavane glabridin, found in the roots of liquorice, are phytoestrogens.

Licorice Root
By The original uploader was Jeansef at French Wikipedia. – Transferred from fr.wikipedia to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2772919

Medicinal Uses of Licorice Root

The chemicals contained in licorice are thought to decrease swelling, thin mucus secretions, decrease cough, and increase the chemicals in our body that heal ulcers.

Licorice is taken by mouth for various digestive system complaints including stomach ulcers, heartburn, colic, and ongoing inflammation of the lining of the stomach (chronic gastritis).

Some people take licorice by mouth for sore throat, bronchitis, cough, and infections caused by bacteria or viruses.

Licorice is also taken by mouth for Addison’s disease, a type of diabetes caused by a hormone deficiency (diabetes insipidus), menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), liver disorders, malaria, tuberculosis, high potassium levels in the blood, food poisoning, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a condition in which there is too much muscle tone (hypertonia), abscesses, recovery after surgery, rash, high cholesterol.

Licorice is recommended to treat respiratory problems. Taking licorice as an oral supplement can help the body produce healthy mucus. Increasing phlegm production may seem counterintuitive to a healthy bronchial system. However, the opposite is true. The production of clean, healthy phlegm keeps the respiratory system functioning without old, sticky mucus clogging it.

Licorice is sometimes taken by mouth along with the herbs Panax ginseng and Bupleurum falcatum to improve the function of the adrenal glands, especially in people who have taken steroid drugs long-term. Steroids tend to suppress the activity of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands produce important hormones that regulate the body’s response to stress.

Licorice is also taken by mouth in combination with peony to increase fertility in women with a hormonal disorder called polycystic ovary syndrome, to treat people with abnormal levels of a hormone prolactin, for muscle cramps, and to reduce cancer pain. In combination with other herbs, licorice is also used to treat prostate cancer and the skin disorder known as eczema. Licorice is also taken in combination with andrographis, Siberian ginseng, and schisandra to treat familial Mediterranean fever. This hereditary condition is characterized by recurrent and painful swelling in the chest, stomach, or joints. A formulation containing licorice root along with slippery elm bark, lactulose, and oat bran has been used for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Some people use licorice as a shampoo to reduce oiliness in their hair. It is also applied as a gel for itchy, inflamed skin (eczema), as a solution to stop bleeding, as a patch in the mouth or as a gargle for canker sores, as a cream for psoriasis, weight loss, or a skin condition characterized by brown spots (melisma), as a gargle for recovery after surgery, and as a paste for dental plaque.

Licorice is used intravenously (by IV) to treat hepatitis B and C, as well as mouth sores (lichen planus) in people with hepatitis C.

Recovery after surgery. Research suggests that sucking on a single lozenge containing licorice (Sualin, Hamdard Pharma, India) beginning 30 minutes before having a tube inserted through the mouth into the trachea reduces cough following surgery by about 50%. Also, gargling with a licorice fluid before intubation reduces complications when the breathing tube is removed.

Bleeding. Early research suggests that applying a specific product containing alpinia, licorice, thyme, stinging nettle, and common grape vine (Ankaferd Blood Stopper, Mefar Ilaç Sanayi A.S., Istanbul, Turkey) to the skin reduces bleeding during surgery, but does not reduce time in surgery. Another early study suggests that applying the same product after dental surgery reduces bleeding.

Hepatitis. There is some evidence that certain components in licorice might be effective in treating hepatitis B and hepatitis C when given intravenously (by IV). Early research shows that using a specific IV product (Stronger Neominophagen C, Minophagen Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd) seems to reduce death by about 50%. However, the studies involved too few patients to draw firm conclusions.

High cholesterol. Early research suggests that taking licorice root extract daily for 1 month reduces total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in people with high cholesterol.

High potassium levels. Some research suggests that certain components in licorice decrease potassium levels in people with diabetes or kidney problems.

Hot flashes during menopause. Some early research shows that taking licorice root extract can reduce the number and intensity of hot flashes in menopausal women. But other early research shows that taking licorice root extract does not significantly reduce the number or intensity of hot flashes.

Muscle cramps. Early research suggests that taking a specific product containing licorice and peony (Shakuyaku-kanzo-to) might reduce muscle cramps in people with liver disease (hepatic cirrhosis) or in people undergoing treatment for kidney failure (hemodialysis).

Liver disease not associated with alcohol use (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). Early research suggests that taking 2 grams of licorice root extract daily for 2 months reduces test markers of liver injury in patients with liver disease not caused by drinking alcohol.

Pain. Early research suggests that taking a combination of licorice root and peony root with Taiwanese tonic vegetable soup containing lily bulb, lotus seed, and jujube fruit reduces pain in cancer patients.

Psoriasis. Early evidence suggests that applying a cream containing licorice and milk to the skin for 4 weeks does not reduce the amount of standard therapy needed, but does seem to improve skin peeling in patients with psoriasis.

Weight loss. There is conflicting information about the use of licorice for weight loss. Licorice seems to reduce body fat. However, it causes water retention that can offset any change in body weight.Other research suggests that taking a specific licorice product (Glavonoid) daily for 8 weeks has no effect on weight or body fat.

Licorice root

Caution Must Be Taken with Licorice Root

Liquorice extracts have been used in herbalism and traditional medicine. Excessive consumption of liquorice (more than 2 mg/kg/day of pure glycyrrhizinic acid, a liquorice component) may result in adverse effects, such as hypokalemia, increased blood pressure, and muscle weakness.

The United States Food and Drug Administration believes that foods containing liquorice and its derivatives (including glycyrrhizin) are safe if not consumed excessively. Other jurisdictions have suggested no more than 100 mg to 200 mg of glycyrrhizin per day, the equivalent of about 70 to 150 g (2.5 to 5.3 oz) of liquorice. Liquorice should not be used during pregnancy.

An increase in intake of liquorice can cause many toxic effects. Hyper-mineralocorticosteroid syndrome can occur when the body retains sodium, loses potassium altering biochemical and hormonal activities. Some of these activities include lower aldosterone level, decline of the renin-angiotensin system and increased levels of the atrial natriuretic hormone in order to compensate the variations in homoeostasis.

Some other symptoms of toxicity include electrolyte imbalance, edema, increased blood pressure, weight gain, heart problems, and weakness. Individuals will experience certain symptoms based on the severity of toxicity. Some other complaints include fatigue, shortness of breath, renal failure, and paralysis.

Licorice root

Dosage and Forms

Liquid extract: Licorice extract is the most commonly found form of licorice. It’s used as a commercial sweetener in candies and beverages. Licorice extract consumption by an individual should not exceed 30 mg/mL of glycyrrhizic acid. Ingesting more could cause unwanted side effects.

Powder: Health food stores and online specialty retailers sell licorice powder. Combined with a gel base, it can become a topical ointment that clears the skin. In its powder form, licorice is especially helpful in treating eczema and acne. You can also pour the powder into vegetable capsules and ingest them orally. The recommended dosage of licorice root is less than 75 milligrams per day, according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines.

Tea: Licorice plant leaves, dried and crushed into a tea, have become popular. You can purchase these teas at supermarkets and health food stores. Teas are used to promote digestive, respiratory, and adrenal gland health. When you see herbal teas for “bronchial wellness” and “cleanse and detox,” they usually contain forms of licorice. The popular throat remedy known as Throat Coat tea is a combination of marshmallow root, licorice root, and elm bark. It’s not recommended that people ingest more than 8 ounces of licorice tea per day.

DGL: licorice with glycyrrhizin removed, which is a safer form. DGL should contain no more than 2 percent glycyrrhizin. This form is recommended for gastrointestinal symptoms as long-term intake may be needed. DGL is available in chewable tablets, capsules, tea, and powder. Consume no more than 5 grams of DGL per day.

 

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquorice
  2. https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/licorice-root-powder/profile
  3. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-881/licorice
  4. https://www.truthinaging.com/ingredients/glycyrrhiza-glabra
  5. https://www.healthline.com/health/licorice-the-sweet-root
  6. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/licoriceroot
  7. https://www.drugs.com/npp/licorice.html
  8. http://www.naturesownherbs.com/ns/DisplayMonograph.asp?storeID=f541321fca7a46f39570f4b746463119&DocID=bottomline-licorice
  9. https://www.medicinenet.com/licorice_glycyrrhiza_glabra-oral/article.htm
  10. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/glycyrrhiza-glabra
  11. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=184.1408
  12. http://medherb.com/Materia_Medica/Glycyrrhiza_-_Licorice_root_and_testosterone.htm
  13. http://jpsionline.com/admin/php/uploads/30_pdf.pdf
  14. http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9924491
  15. http://www.florajournal.com/archives/2014/vol2issue2/PartC/23.1.pdf
  16. https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=19&contentid=Licorice
  17. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/32de/fb274c43ec6c87281b103d0b680162b5f77c.pdf
  18. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jamc/2016/7201740/

 

Lemongrass Oil

Lemongrass Essential Oil (Cymbopogon citratus & flexuosus)

@Hakcipta Yosri – Dibebaskan di bawah {CC|Version 2}

West Indian: Cymbopogon citratus

East Indian: Cymbopogon flexuosus

Lemongrass is a fibrous herb with a fragrance similar to lemons that belong to the family Poaceae, which consists of 55 other varieties of grasses, two of which are popularly used. The first, Cymbopogon flexuosus, and is most commonly used for producing essential oils. The second, Cymbopogon citratus, is the lemongrass most often used for culinary purposes.

Lemongrass is known to improve circulation, promote digestion, provide relief to fever, stabilize menstrual cycles, increase immunity, treat infections, and act as an insecticide.

Cymbopogon, better known as lemongrass, is a genus of Asian, African, Australian, and tropical island plants in the grass family. Some species (particularly Cymbopogon citratus) are commonly cultivated as culinary and medicinal herbs because of their scent, resembling that of lemons (Citrus limon). Common names include lemon grass, barbed wire grass, silky heads, citronella grass, cha de Dartigalongue, fever grass, tanglad, hierba Luisa, or gavati chahapati, amongst many others.

Lemongrass is widely used as a culinary herb in Asian cuisines and also as a medicinal herb in India. It has a subtle citrus flavor and can be dried and powdered, or used fresh. It is commonly used in teas, soups, and curries. It is also suitable for use with poultry, fish, beef, and seafood. It is often used as a tea in African countries such as Togo, south eastern Ghana Volta Region and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Latin American countries such as Mexico.

Lemongrass oil is used as a pesticide and a preservative. Research shows that lemongrass oil has antifungal properties. Despite its ability to repel some insects, such as mosquitoes, its oil is commonly used as a “lure” to attract honey bees. “Lemongrass works conveniently as well as the pheromone created by the honeybee’s Nasonov gland, also known as attractant pheromones. Because of this, lemongrass oil can be used as a lure when trapping swarms or attempting to draw the attention of hived bees.”

Lemongrass oil, used as a pesticide and preservative, is put on the ancient palm-leaf manuscripts found in India as a preservative. It is used at the Oriental Research Institute Mysore, the French Institute of Pondicherry, the Association for the Preservation of the Saint Thomas Christian Heritage in Kerala, and many other manuscript collections in India. The oil also injects natural fluidity into the brittle palm leaves, and the hydrophobic nature of the oil keeps the manuscripts dry so the text is not lost to decay due to humidity.

East Indian lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus), also called Cochin grass or Malabar grass, is native to Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, and Thailand, while West Indian lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) is native to South Asia and maritime Southeast Asia. While both can be used interchangeably, C. citratus is more suitable for cooking. In India, C. citratus is used both as a medical herb and in perfumes.

Lemongrass essential oil contains beneficial terpene components that actively work on different parts of the body to remedy a range of conditions. The main terpene compounds in lemongrass essential oil include citronellal, nerol, limonene, geraniol, geranyl acetate, citral, and myrcene.

  • Citral has antiviral, antiseptic and antioxidant properties.
  • Citronellal has antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal and sedative properties.
  • Geraniol has antioxidant, antibacterial, antiseptics and analgesic properties.
  • Geranyl acetate has antioxidant, antibacterial, antiseptics and analgesic properties.
  • Limonene has digestive, appetite suppressing, detoxifying and antioxidant properties.
  • Neral has antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and apoptotic properties.
  • Nerol has antioxidant, sedative, and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Myrcene has anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antibiotic, and sedative properties.

Lemongrass essential oil is a source of essential vitamins such as vitamin A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, folate and vitamin C. It also provides essential minerals such as magnesium, phosphorous, manganese, copper, potassium, calcium, zinc and iron.

Beneficial Uses of Lemongrass Essential Oil (HealthLine.com)

The health benefits of lemongrass essential oil can be attributed to its beneficial properties as an analgesic, antidepressant, antimicrobial, antipyretic, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, diuretic, febrifuge, fungicidal, galactagogue, insecticidal, nervine, sedative, and a tonic. Lemongrass is versatile, and its uses range from cooking to cosmetics, to cleaning products, to medicines. Lemongrass essential oil helps to cure cellulite, fungal infections, and digestive problems, while simultaneously reducing excessive perspiration.

Antianxiety: High blood pressure is a common side effect of stress. Many studies have shown that aromatherapy eases stress and anxiety. Combining aromatherapy with massage may bring greater benefits. A 2015 study evaluated the effects of lemongrass and sweet almond massage oil during massage. Study participants who received a massage using the oil once a week for three weeks had lower diastolic blood pressure than those in the control group. Systolic blood pressure and pulse rate weren’t affected.

Antibacterial: Lemongrass is used as a natural remedy to heal wounds and help prevent infection. Research from 2010 found lemongrass essential oil was effective against a variety of drug-resistant bacteria.

Antidiarrheal: Diarrhea is often just a bother, but it can also cause dehydration. Over-the-counter diarrhea remedies can come with unpleasant side effects — like constipation — leading some people to turn to natural remedies. According to a 2006 study, lemongrass may help slow diarrhea. The study showed that the oil reduced fecal output in mice with castor oil-induced diarrhea, possibly by slowing intestinal motility.

Antifungal: Fungi are organisms like yeast and mold. According to an older study from 1996, lemongrass oil was an effective deterrent against four types of fungi. One type causes athlete’s foot, ringworm, and jock itch. Researchers found that, to be effective, at least 2.5 percent of the solution must be lemongrass oil.

Anti-inflammatory: Chronic inflammation is thought to cause many health problems. These include arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and even cancer. Lemongrass contains citral, an anti-inflammatory compound. According to a 2014 study on animals, lemongrass essential oil showed powerful anti-inflammatory abilities on mice with carrageenan-induced paw edema. The oil also demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects when applied topically on mice with ear edema.

Antioxidant: Antioxidants help your body fight off free radicals that damage cells. Research has shown that lemongrass essential oil helps hunt free radicals. According to a 2011 study, lemongrass oil mouthwash showed strong antioxidant abilities. Researchers suggest it’s a potential complementary therapy for non-surgical dental procedures and gingivitis.

Antipyretic: fever reducing. This is quite similar to a febrifuge but it is effective on very high fever as well. This oil can bring down fever when it is tending to reach dangerous levels. This property of lemongrass, which comes from its essential oils, is widely known and utilized.

Antiseptic: The antiseptic properties of lemongrass oil make it a good application for external and internal wounds as well as a useful ingredient in antiseptic lotions and creams.

Antispasmodic: Lemongrass oil benefits also include its ability to help relieve muscle aches, cramps and spasms. It may also help to improve circulation.

Carminative: reducing gas, alleviating flatulence. It not only helps to remove gas from the intestine but also stops further gas formation. Furthermore, it provides the excess gas a safe downward passage by relaxing the muscles in the abdominal region.

Deodorizer: Use lemongrass oil as a natural and safe air freshener or deodorizer. You can add the oil to water and use it as a mist or use an oil diffuser or vaporizer. By adding other essential oils, like lavender or tea tree oil, you can customize your own natural fragrance. Cleaning with lemongrass essential oil is another great idea because not only does it naturally deodorize your home, but it also helps to sanitize it.

Digestive: Lemongrass is used as a folk remedy for a number of digestive problems, ranging from stomachaches to gastric ulcers. According to a 2012 study on mice, lemongrass essential oil helped prevent gastric ulcers, a common cause of stomach pain. Lemongrass is also a common ingredient in herbal teas and supplements for nausea. Although most herbal products use dried lemongrass leaves, using the essential oil for aromatherapy may provide similar benefits.

Diuretic: Lemongrass oil increases the frequency of urination. When a person urinates, fats are lost from the body, because 4% of the volume of urine is composed of them. Obviously, the more you urinate, the more you lose fat. Urination also promotes digestion and inhibits the formation of excess gas. It removes excess water from the body and reduces swelling. The most important contribution of this oil is that it removes toxins from the body, not to mention its ability to reduce blood pressure. That is the reason why most pharmaceutical medications for lowering blood pressure induce frequent urination. Urination also helps clean the kidneys.

Galactagogue: increases the formation of milk in the breasts. It also enhances the quality of the milk. This property is very helpful for lactating mothers and babies who need this vital source of food. Babies are prone to infections, so the antimicrobial and antibacterial properties of lemongrass oil are also absorbed in the milk, thus indirectly helping the baby avoid such infections.

Glucose Regulation: Lemongrass oil may help reduce blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a 2007 study on rats. For the study, the rats were treated with a daily oral dose of 125 to 500 milligrams (mg) of lemongrass oil for 42 days. Results showed lemongrass oil lowered blood sugar levels. It also changed lipid parameters while increasing so-called good cholesterol levels (HDL).

Hair Care: Lemongrass oil can strengthen your hair follicles, so if you are struggling with hair loss or an itchy and irritated scalp, massage a few drops of lemongrass oil into your scalp for two minutes and then rinse. The soothing and bacteria-killing properties will leave your hair shiny, fresh and odor-free.

Immunostimulant: stimulating the function of the immune system. Lemongrass oil can help to boost your immune system with its antimicrobial and therapeutic properties. In vitro research has also shown that the oil can reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, which can contribute to illness.

Pain Relief: The citral in lemongrass essential oil may help ease pain as it relieves inflammation. According to a 2017 study on people with rheumatoid arthritis, topical lemongrass oil decreased their arthritis pain. On average, pain levels were gradually reduced from 80 to 50 percent within 30 days.

According to researchers in Australia, native Australian lemongrass may relieve pain caused by headaches and migraines. The researchers believe that a compound in lemongrass called eugenol has similar abilities to aspirin. Eugenol is thought to prevent blood platelets from clumping together. It also releases serotonin. Serotonin is a hormone that regulates mood, sleep, appetite, and cognitive functions.

Sedative: It has great soothing, sedating and calming effects on the mind, cures inflammations, itching of skin and it relieves tension and anxiety. This feature can help patients with insomnia as well.

Skin Care: Add lemongrass oil to shampoos, conditioners, deodorants, soaps and lotions. Lemongrass oil is an effective cleanser for all skin types; its antiseptic and astringent properties make lemongrass oil perfect for getting even and glowing skin, and thus part of your natural skin care routine. It can sterilize your pores, serve as a natural toner and strengthen your skin tissues. By rubbing this oil into your hair, scalp and body, you can alleviate headaches or muscle pain.

Tonic: It tones all the systems functioning in the body, such as the respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, and excretory system, and facilitates absorption of nutrients into the body, thus providing strength and boosting the immune system.

Triglyceridemia: reduction of triglycerides (cholesterol) in the blood stream. Statin drugs have this action on the circulatory system. High cholesterol may increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. It’s important to keep your cholesterol levels stable. Lemongrass is traditionally used to treat high cholesterol and manage heart disease. A 2007 study helps support its use for those conditions. The study found lemongrass oil significantly reduced cholesterol in rats who had been fed a high cholesterol diet for 14 days. The positive reaction was dose-dependent, which means that its effects changed when the dose was changed.

How to Use Lemongrass Essential Oil

  • To use lemongrass in aromatherapy, add up to 12 drops of essential oil (depending on your sense of smell) to 1 teaspoon carrier oil such as coconut oil, sweet almond oil, or jojoba oil. Mix into a warm bath or massage into your skin. Never apply essential oils directly to your skin.
  • You can also inhale lemongrass oil directly. Add a few drops to a cotton ball or handkerchief and breathe in the aroma. Some people massage the diluted essential oil into their temples to help relieve headaches.
  • Lemongrass Essential Oil can be helpful when carefully used in very-very low dilution by those that are challenged with acne-prone skin.
  • For Mind and Spirit, Robbie Zeck shares this about Lemongrass Essential Oil: “The intense, radiant energy of Lemongrass inspires expansion on all levels. Whenever there is a sense of restriction or limitation in life, Lemongrass lifts the spirits and gets things moving again.” [Robbi Zeck, ND, The Blossoming Heart: Aromatherapy for Healing and Transformation (Victoria, Australia: Aroma Tours, 2008), 92.]

Possible Side Effects and Risks

Although cold pressed Lemon Essential Oil is phototoxic, steam distilled Lemongrass Essential Oil is not phototoxic. However, Lemongrass Essential Oil is abundant in citral (geranial and neral). It can pose a significant risk of skin sensitization when used over 0.7% in topical applications. A little goes a very long way in topical formulations.

Lemongrass essential oil is highly concentrated. Its side effects aren’t well-studied. In some people, they may be stronger than the side effects of the lemongrass plant.

Lemongrass may cause an allergic reaction or skin irritation when used topically.

Other reported side effects of oral lemongrass include:

  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • increased appetite
  • increased urination

Essential oils may be toxic when ingested. You shouldn’t ingest lemongrass essential oil.

Lemongrass, in its plant-form, is generally safe to use in food and beverages. Higher amounts may increase your risk of developing side effects.

You should also talk to your doctor before use if you:

  • have diabetes or low blood sugar
  • have a respiratory condition, such as asthma
  • have liver disease
  • are undergoing chemotherapy
  • are pregnant
  • are breastfeeding

You shouldn’t use lemongrass as a complementary therapy or in place of your regular treatment for any condition unless under your doctor’s supervision.

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cymbopogon
  2. https://www.healthline.com/health/lemongrass-essential-oil
  3. https://monq.com/eo/essential-oils/lemongrass/
  4. https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/lemongrass-oil.asp
  5. https://draxe.com/lemongrass-essential-oil/
  6. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/health-benefits-of-lemongrass-essential-oil.html
  7. https://www.up-nature.com/blogs/news/top-30-lemongrass-essential-oil-benefits-and-uses
  8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19292822
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21693164
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19656204
  11. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/307583343_Antioxidant_activity_of_lemon_grass_ESSENTIAL_OIL_Cympopogon_citratus_grown_in_North_Indian_plains
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3492709/
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25242268
  14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3326778/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19662581
  16. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-719/lemongrass
  17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22862808
  18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3326778/
  19. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5303933_Antifungal_activity_of_the_Lemon_grass_oil_and_citral_against_Candida_spp
  20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217679/
  21. https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/lemongrass
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217679/
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26366471
  24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217679/
  25. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1753786
  26. https://www.britannica.com/science/citral#ref149735
  27. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15796587

What is in Your Commercial Lotion?

Since Vaseline is the most common commercially produced lotion on the market we will break it down and show you what’s in it and why it really should not go on your skin.

We’ll review the directions, warnings, ingredients, and storage. After this review please reconsider applying any of these chemicals to your skin.

Try Mother Gaia’s lotion, simply made of beeswax, organic coconut and sunflower oils, filtered zero water, and 0.02% Borax (sodium tetraborate) as the emulsifier.

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: White Petrolatum USP (100%)……….…Skin Protectant

Other Ingredients: Water, Glycerin, Petrolatum, Stearic Acid, Glycol Stearate, Dimethicone, Isopropyl Isostearate, Dihydroxypropyltrimonium Chloride, Hydroxyethyl Urea, Tapioca Starch, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Magnesium Aluminium Silicate, Stearamide AMP, Carbomer, Isopropyl Myristate, Cedrol, Triethanolamine, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Methylparaben, Propylparaben

WHAT ARE THESE INGREDIENTS?

Carbomer: class of chemicals made from acrylic acid. They are thickening agents that help control the viscosity and flow of cosmetic products. They are also solvents, helping formulas to stay well mixed. You’ll find them in styling gels, facial moisturizers, sunscreen, shampoo, anti-aging treatments, cleansers, and scrubs. Though generally considered safe, they can sometimes contain “neutralizing agents” TEA or EDTA. It is a known allergen that causes eye irritation. These can carry contaminants that can be potentially carcinogenic.

Cedrol: is a sesquiterpene alcohol found in the essential oil of conifers (cedar oil), especially in the genera Cupressus (cypress) and Juniperus (juniper). It has also been identified in Origanum onites, a plant related to oregano. Cedrol has toxic and possibly carcinogenic properties when extracted and concentrated.

Cetearyl Alcohol: fatty alcohol that’s either produced from the end products of the petroleum industry or derived from plants (palm oil-palmityl alcohol). It comes in the form of a white, waxy solid. It’s no longer derived from sperm whale oil (where it was originally discovered) seeing how whales are now an endangered species.

  • Cetearyl alcohol is also a surfactant that boosts a products foaming capacity. This property is important in bath soaps, hand soaps, shampoos, conditioners and many other personal care products.
  • Cetearyl alcohol is also a main ingredient in cosmetics such as foundations, concealers, liquid lipsticks and mascaras to stabilize a solution and to prevent the separation of emulsions.
  • Small amounts of alcohol applied to skin cells in lab settings (about 3% alcohol, but keep in mind skin-care products contain amounts ranging from 5% to 60% or more) over the course of two days increased cell death by 26%. It also destroyed the substances in cells that reduce inflammation and defend against free radicals.
  • Exposure to alcohol causes skin cells to literally self-destruct and the longer the exposure to alcohol continues, the worse it gets for your skin cells. The same study found that only two days of exposure was dramatically more harmful than one day of exposure, and that was using an alcohol concentration of less than 10%, which is much lower than what’s in many alcohol-based skin-care products.
  • This research clearly demonstrates the connection between free-radical damage to skin cells and alcohol exposure. Interestingly, this is exceptionally similar to the free-radical damage that results from excessive consumption of alcohol in the short and long term.

Dimethicone: it’s a silicon oil, man-made in the laboratory and used in personal care products as an anti-foaming agent, skin protectant, and skin and hair conditioner. Manufacturers like it because it makes products easily spreadable, so you get that feeling of the lotion or cream gliding over your skin. Dimethicone also helps form a protective barrier on the skin, and can fill in the fine lines and wrinkles on the face, which is why it’s often used in makeup primers.

Why Dimethicone is Bad for Your Skin? That artificial coating on the outside of skin causes several issues:

  • It traps everything under it—including bacteria, sebum, and impurities—which could lead to increased breakouts and blackheads
  • The coating action actually prevents the skin from performing its normal activities—like sweating, temperature regulating, sloughing off dead skin cells, etc.
  • Prolonged exposure to dimethicone can actually increase skin irritation, due to the coating property and because dimethicone is listed as a possible skin and eye irritant
  • Those with sensitive or reactive skin are at risk of an allergic reaction to dimethicone
  • On top of all this, dimethicone is a non-biodegradable chemical—bad for the environment
  • You’re creating a dependency on the coating product, disrupting the skin’s own hydrating processes, which in the end increases dryness, making fine lines and wrinkles more noticeable
  • The coating properties may increase breakouts, particularly if you’re susceptible to acne, which will lead to scars and older-looking skin
  • You’re doing nothing to boost the health and vitality of the skin, thus letting aging take its toll

Dihydroxypropyltrimonium Chloride: This raw material is a captive molecule of Unilever, trademarked as “Glycerol Quat™”. Glycerol Quat is basically a moisturizing / hydrating agent. Developed by DOW chemical.

Disodium EDTA: primarily used as a preservative and stabilizer, this ingredient is essentially used to prevent products from deteriorating and from smelling rancid.  This can usually be found in most skin care products.

Glycerine: (also known as glycerol) has enjoyed a long career as a key moisturizing ingredient, and while it can be obtained from both vegetable or animal fats and oils, it is most commonly derived from biodiesel waste courtesy of the saponification of oil and fat. The non-toxic and eco-friendly substance certainly seals moisture into skin, but it does so while also triggering subdermal skin layers to dry out, creating a chronically chapped sensation.

Glyceryl Stearate: Is chemically used to reduce the greasiness of an oil and to stabilize the product.

Glycol Stearate:  produced by chemically reacting stearic acid and ethylene glycol; Like many other long chain oil derived ingredients glycol stearate is used as a skin conditioning agent (emollient), but according to the cosmetic database it is also used as a surfactant, opacifying agent and an emulsifier, find most use in shampoos, body washes and moisturizers (US Department of Health and Human Services).

Hydroxyethyl Urea: this ingredient is derived from the urine and other bodily fluids of animals.  Used as a humectant and skin conditioning.

Isopropyl Isostearate: the ester of isopropyl alcohol and isostearic acid, is used as a skin conditioning agent-emollient in cosmetic products.

Isopropyl Myristate: a polar emollient and is used in cosmetic and topical medicinal preparations where good absorption into the skin is desired. Isopropyl myristate is being studied as a skin enhancer. It is also used as a pesticide against head lice which works by dissolving the wax that covers the exoskeleton of head lice, killing them by dehydration.

Magnesium Aluminium Silicate: is a naturally occurring mineral derived from refined and purified clay that is used primarily as a thickener.  Although the molecules are too large to be absorbed into skin, there is always concern about the use of aluminum.

Methylparaben: is a chemical preservative used as a fungicide in skin care products that is readily absorbed through the skin. There is controversy over the safety of this ingredient.

Petrolatum: another term for petroleum jelly. Petrolatum is mineral oil jelly (i.e. petroleum jelly). It is used as a barrier to lock moisture in the skin in a variety of moisturizers and also in hair care products to make your hair shine.

  • A petroleum product, petrolatum can be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Studies suggest that exposure to PAHs — including skin contact over extended periods of time — is associated with cancer. On this basis, the European Union classifies petrolatum a carcinogen ii and restricts its use in cosmetics. PAHs in petrolatum can also cause skin irritation and allergies.
  • In the European Union, petrolatum can only be used in cosmetics “if the full refining history is known and it can be shown that the substance from which it is produced is not a carcinogen.” There is no parallel restriction in Canada. Petrolatum has been flagged for future assessment under the government’s Chemicals Management Plan.
  • Mineral oil and petroleum distillates are related petroleum by-products used in cosmetics. Like petrolatum, these ingredients may be contaminated with PAHs.

Phenoxyethanol: is a glycol ether that has a commercial, laboratory-produced synthetic counterpart. In its pure chemical form, it is a colorless liquid with a pleasant odor, commonly used in perfumes and cosmetics. Other uses for phenoxyethanol are insect repellents, antiseptics, solvents, anesthetics, soaps, cellulose acetate solvents, dyes, stamp pads, ballpoints, inks, and preservatives used for human specimen dissection.

  • Phenoxyethanol has antimicrobial, antibacterial, and germicidal properties, and is used for preserving pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and lubricants. While it may have those benefits, it also has toxicologic properties when inhaled, ingested, or contacted on the skin in large, or concentrated amounts.
  • Severe eye and skin irritation and damage, including eczema, hives.
  • Lung irritation, hypotension, ventricular dysrhythmias.
  • Brain cell damage, central nervous system (CNS) depression which includes decreased breathing rate, decreased heart rate, loss of consciousness leading to coma or death due to inhibition of the brain’s activity.
  • Repeated, long-term exposure causes organ damage, including peritonitis, serositis, and renal injury.
  • Nipple cream used by lactating mothers can cause severe CNS problems and other digestive disorders in infants.
  • Exposure to small amounts of phenoxyethanol may cause dermal, ocular, and lung irritation.
  • Excessive and long-term exposure to phenoxyethanol can cause severe damage to internal organs.
  • Small amounts of the chemical compound can be largely found in cosmetics and should be avoided according to the European Commission on Cosmetic Ingredients (CosIng).
  • Phenoxyethanol is toxic to the kidneys, liver, and nervous system.

Propylparaben: used as an anti-fungal preservative, it occurs as a natural substance found in many plants, although it is manufactured synthetically for use in cosmetics.  Use of parabens is quite controversial.

Stearic Acid: is a saturated long-chain fatty acid with an 18-carbon backbone. Stearic acid is found in various animal and plant fats, and is a major component of cocoa butter and shea butter. Stearic acid, also called octadecanoic acid, is one of the useful types of saturated fatty acids that comes from many animal and vegetable fats and oils.

  • It is a waxy solid, and its chemical formula is CH3(CH2)16COOH. Its name comes from the Greek word stear, which means tallow. Its IUPAC name is octadecanoic acid. — Wikipedia.
  • Stearic acid is a white, waxy natural acid that can be found in animal and vegetable fats. It is used as an emulsifier and emollient.
  • Stearic acid can cause skin irritations with symptoms of severe itching, redness, and swelling, and rash-like symptoms similar to tiny red spots.
  • Stearic acid can also make the skin sensitive to substances and direct exposure to the sun.
  • Stearic acid cause hive-like spots in the skin which often lead to blisters that can damage the skin.
  • Stearic acid can be harmful to the environment, particularly the aquatic environment.
  • Stearic acid can be hazardous to the digestive, immune, integumentary, ocular, and respiratory systems.

Stearamide AMP: it is an organic compound derived from a reaction involving ethylenediamine and stearic acid.  It is used as a foam booster and viscosity increasing agent.  It is thought to be of low toxicity, however very little information was available.

Triethanolamine:  also known as TEA, is a reactionary byproduct of two toxic substances: ethylene oxide and ammonia. Triethanolamine is used for several purposes in a variety of cosmetics and personal care items. Its main purpose is to balance the pH level of products, but it also helps to emulsify ingredients that usually do not blend well. This ensures they spread smoothly on skin and hair and prolongs shelf-life. Additionally, Triethanolamine is a sometimes a foaming agent and adds fragrance to products.

  • The problem then rests in the hands of the consumer, who may be absorbing small amounts Triethanolamine into their skin via many common products used daily. The accumulation of small doses of this toxic substance then becomes a large dose. Continual daily exposure over long periods of time may be extremely unhealthy.
  • Triethanolamine can cause skin, hair and eye irritation and inflammation on a short term and long-term basis. Its immediate effects include itchy, watery eyes, dry and brittle hair and itchy skin. Over time, Triethanolamine use can cause chemical damage to skin such as blisters, a hot, burning sensation, hives and flakiness.
  • In clinical trials done on animals, high doses of Triethanolamine caused liver, bladder and testicular cancer. Similar animal studies showed Triethanolamine can have negative effects on organs, even in low doses, especially when applied around the lips, mouth and eyes. Triethanolamine has also proven to be an immune system and respiratory toxicant, as well as a skin and full body allergen. It may cause genetic mutations in vitro as well.
  • Additionally, Triethanolamine can be carcinogenic when combined in products with N-nitrosating agents as these may react to form nitrosamines.

 

DRUGS.COM – Information on Topical Emollients

What is Vaseline Intensive Care?

Emollients are substances that moisten and soften your skin.

Topical (for the skin) emollients are used to treat or prevent dry skin. Vaseline Intensive Care are sometimes contained in products that also treat acne, chapped lips, diaper rash, cold sores, or other minor skin irritation.

Important Information

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use a topical emollient if you are allergic to it. Vaseline Intensive Care will not treat or prevent a skin infection.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use Vaseline Intensive Care if you have: deep wounds or open sores; swelling, warmth, redness, oozing, or bleeding; large areas of skin irritation; any type of allergy; or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I use Vaseline Intensive Care?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Clean the skin where you will apply the topical emollient. It may help to apply this product when your skin is wet or damp. Follow directions on the product label.

Apply a small amount of topical emollient to the affected area and rub in gently.

If you are using a stick, pad, or soap form of topical emollient, follow directions for use on the product label.

Do not use this product over large area of skin. Do not apply a topical emollient to a deep puncture wound or severe burn without medical advice.

If your skin appears white or gray and feels soggy, you may be applying too much topical emollient or using it too often.

Some forms of topical emollient may be flammable and should not be used near high heat or open flame, or applied while you are smoking.

Store as directed away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle, tube, or other container tightly closed when not in use.

What should I avoid while taking Vaseline Intensive Care?

Avoid getting Vaseline Intensive Care in your eyes, nose, or mouth. If this does happen, rinse with water.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Some Vaseline Intensive Care can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight or UV rays.

Vaseline Intensive Care side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using the topical emollient and call your doctor if you have severe burning, stinging, redness, or irritation where the product was applied.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

 

 

References:

  1. https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=696246be-8761-48a7-929c-ae412e43762a
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